Velvet Eyes: I Was Looking For Her In Varsovia But She Was Not On Time So I Left And Met Her In Another Town Of The Country! 7th New Episode (1946). Publication: Sept 7, 2009. A Story By Mike Fuller, PhD.

August 29, 2009

We were to Varsovia, Warsaw, before the War and I liked it a lot. People were really so happy in this town, capital of Poland, even if they were not rich. A mood of gentleness was in the air and we had several splendid weekends with Val there. Now, it would be probably something else after the city was a martyr of the Germans. About 85% of Warsaw had been destroyed, including the historic Old Town and the Royal Castle. Hitler ordered at the end of the war the entire city to be razed to the ground! It was a vision of ruins and apocalypse. I could not imagine more destruction in one only place and it gave me the idea to write an article about it. Like the Phoenix, Warsaw will live again and more and more with new buildings, new progress, new spirit of development.
I was invited by a historic society for a conference, in the suburbs, about the role of the Resistance in Europe during the War. Valentine could not come with me because she was obliged to attend an important meeting of the Museums of Prague, decided at the last minute. But she scheduled to join us for the conference the following day. It created a source of confusion and I was at the train station and did not find her. Her train was blocked in Lodz on its way to Warsaw, she called the hotel and gave a phone number. She could not be there for the conference but she would work on another objective of this travel: to locate a couple of people who expressed us, before the war, their interest for the United states, during their stay in Prague: Mr. and Mrs. Glogow. I would join Valentine after the conference in Lodz, it was the best to do because everything was so complicated here and a crowd of busy people always around you gave you the feeling that you were lost or not at the right place.
The conference was a long one and I analyzed, for every European country, the importance of the  population resistance against the Third Reich. There were in the audience some historians, journalists and veterans and they told me at the cocktail after my speech that they were surprised by my knowledge and all the details I gave. “For an American, You have the culture and the contacts of an European insider!” They were readers of our clandestine magazine ‘Live Freedom’, so I informed them that we were stopping its monthly publishing next month, now that the war was over. Some of them asked for the text of the conference and I replied that it would be published in the last issue of our magazine. We did a great job with this publication and the whole collection was now available in important public libraries of the continent.
I was thinking about Ignacy and Giertruda Glogow. They were a couple of lawyers in Warsaw in the 1930’s. They came to Prague for some vacation and heard about my solidarity work at the American Embassy. So they wanted to meet me with Valentine and invited us for a lunch in one of the best restaurants of the capital. They were really generous fellows and they decided to send a check of a very important amount to a non-profit that we supported, specialized to give assistance to the unemployed people from the small cities of Czechoslovakia. I was surprised by this decision and I told them that they would be our guests next time they would come in Prague and we would go together to several little towns to see the social system and check that poverty was reduced. They told me: “next year!” but it was already 1937 and there was no next year without war and chaos.
I called them a couple of times in Poland and they were preparing a move to another place in the country as Warsaw was for them a part of their past because they lost their clients who were, almost all of them, Jewish people. Unfortunately, I lost the sheet of paper where I wrote the name of the town where they were relocating. I was upset not to find it during weeks but I thought that after the war, I would go there and check their name in the phone books in Warsaw. I always kept this idea in mind but when I was there, the incident of Valentine’s train after her first postponement for my conference were events that made me forget to go to the central post office. So I left for Lodz the following day, dreaming in the train about the reconstruction of Warsaw, drawing some buildings on a sheet of paper, waiting for my love to be at the train station in this nation of proud folks destroyed by the German fanatics but still alive and ambitious enough to rebuild a future for Poland. Some Polish travelers in the train said “Hello!” to me as they heard I was speaking English and told me: “Thank you America!”. I replied: “War is over, thank you God!”
Our train arrived in Lodz and here too, it was ruins and so many destruction to forget with projects of a better tomorrow. She was waiting for me at the station. I was sure of it and I ran to her, shouting: “Valentine!!”, some flowers, that I bought in Warsaw, in my right hands. “Jo! Jo! I love you!” She kissed me and then told me: “I have a surprise for you my love!” People were looking at us as we didn’t stop kissing and hugging each other. “You know, darling, the Glogow, they live here, in Lodz!! I found in the phone book! I called them, they are inviting us to the restaurant for diner tonight. They sound Ok.” I could not express enough my surprise and my satisfaction. It was a kind of best day of my life. To see again our friends, to know that they were Ok, to be with Valentine, I could have given more in my life to have this incredible moment of peace, tenderness and good news, with my marvelous wife, after so many years together!

We were to Varsovia, Warsaw, before the War and I liked it a lot. People were really so happy in this town, capital of Poland, even if they were not rich. A mood of gentleness was in the air and we had several splendid weekends with Val there. Now, it would be probably something else after the city was a martyr of the Germans. About 85% of Warsaw had been destroyed, including the historic Old Town and the Royal Castle. Hitler ordered at the end of the war the entire city to be razed to the ground! It was a vision of ruins and apocalypse. I could not imagine more destruction in one only place and it gave me the idea to write an article about it. Like the Phoenix, Warsaw will live again and more and more with new buildings, new progress, new spirit of development.

I was invited by a historic society for a conference, in the suburbs, about the role of the Resistance in Europe during the War. Valentine could not come with me because she was obliged to attend an important meeting of the Museums of Prague, decided at the last minute. But she scheduled to join us for the conference the following day. It created a source of confusion and I was at the train station and did not find her. Her train was blocked in Lodz on its way to Warsaw, she called the hotel and gave a phone number. She could not be there for the conference but she would work on another objective of this travel: to locate a couple of people who expressed us, before the war, their interest for the United states, during their stay in Prague: Mr. and Mrs. Glogow. I would join Valentine after the conference in Lodz, it was the best to do because everything was so complicated here and a crowd of busy people always around you gave you the feeling that you were lost or not at the right place.

The conference was a long one and I analyzed, for every European country, the importance of the  population resistance against the Third Reich. There were in the audience some historians, journalists and veterans and they told me at the cocktail after my speech that they were surprised by my knowledge and all the details I gave. “For an American, You have the culture and the contacts of an European insider!” They were readers of our clandestine magazine ‘Live Freedom’, so I informed them that we were stopping its monthly publishing next month, now that the war was over. Some of them asked for the text of the conference and I replied that it would be published in the last issue of our magazine. We did a great job with this publication and the whole collection was now available in important public libraries of the continent.

I was thinking about Ignacy and Giertruda Glogow. They were a couple of lawyers in Warsaw in the 1930’s. They came to Prague for some vacation and heard about my solidarity work at the American Embassy. So they wanted to meet me with Valentine and invited us for a lunch in one of the best restaurants of the capital. They were really generous fellows and they decided to send a check of a very important amount to a non-profit that we supported, specialized to give assistance to the unemployed people from the small cities of Czechoslovakia. I was surprised by this decision and I told them that they would be our guests next time they would come in Prague and we would go together to several little towns to see the social system and check that poverty was reduced. They told me: “next year!” but it was already 1937 and there was no next year without war and chaos.

I called them a couple of times in Poland and they were preparing a move to another place in the country as Warsaw was for them a part of their past because they lost their clients who were, almost all of them, Jewish people. Unfortunately, I lost the sheet of paper where I wrote the name of the town where they were relocating. I was upset not to find it during weeks but I thought that after the war, I would go there and check their name in the phone books in Warsaw. I always kept this idea in mind but when I was there, the incident of Valentine’s train after her first postponement for my conference were events that made me forget to go to the central post office. So I left for Lodz the following day, dreaming in the train about the reconstruction of Warsaw, drawing some buildings on a sheet of paper, waiting for my love to be at the train station in this nation of proud folks destroyed by the German fanatics but still alive and ambitious enough to rebuild a future for Poland. Some Polish travelers in the train said “Hello!” to me as they heard I was speaking English and told me: “Thank you America!”. I replied: “War is over, thank you God!”

Our train arrived in Lodz and here too, it was ruins and so many destruction to forget with projects of a better tomorrow. She was waiting for me at the station. I was sure of it and I ran to her, shouting: “Valentine!!”, some flowers, that I bought in Warsaw, in my right hands. “Jo! Jo! I love you!” She kissed me and then told me: “I have a surprise for you my love!” People were looking at us as we didn’t stop kissing and hugging each other. “You know, darling, the Glogow, they live here, in Lodz!! I found in the phone book! I called them, they are inviting us to the restaurant for diner tonight. They sound Ok.” I could not express enough my surprise and my satisfaction. It was a kind of best day of my life. To see again our friends, to know that they were Ok, to be with Valentine, I could have given more in my life to have this incredible moment of peace, tenderness and good news, with my marvelous wife, after so many years together!”

Velvet Eyes: I Was Looking For Her In Varsovia But She Was Not On Time So I Left And Met Her In Another Town Of The Country! 7th New Episode (1946). Publication: Sept 7, 2009. A Story By Mike Fuller, PhD. All rights reserved.

Joan Miro - Le Coq. They Knew Varsovia But It Was Not The Same Town After The War. Villages Everywhere With Population Rebuilding THeir Life Like In A Novel Mixing Peace And Liberty.

Joan Miro - Le Coq. They Knew Varsovia But It Was Not The Same Town After The War. Villages Everywhere With Population Rebuilding THeir Life Like In A Novel Mixing Peace And Liberty.

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2 Responses to “Velvet Eyes: I Was Looking For Her In Varsovia But She Was Not On Time So I Left And Met Her In Another Town Of The Country! 7th New Episode (1946). Publication: Sept 7, 2009. A Story By Mike Fuller, PhD.”

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