SWEET PORN: GONE WITH THE WIND 2016.

February 29, 2016

SWEET PORN: GONE WITH THE WIND 2016. Robots Replace Negroes As Confederates. Half-Remake For Total Success In 2018 Signed BrAmStOcKeR, The Legendary, A Motion Picture By TIMefraMES! Je lance le projet. Frederic Vidal, seul ou accompagne! Indie In DVD Or Major In Theaters, Make Your Choice!

Teenage Culture and Adult Entertainment, it’s the mix that will give the best superproduction of 2017 on the sets. For the release, it will be in 2018.

gone with the wind

February 22, 2016. Never A So Important Fiction Project By Frederic Vidal Since  FRENCH COP And VELVET EYES, SWEET PORN First ‘Elements Of Screenplay’  Already Online Not To Forget The Shooting Of The Film Next Year.

https://fredvidal.wordpress.com/2016/02/22/never-a-so-important-fiction-project-by-frederic-vidal-since-french-cop-and-velvet-eyes-sweet-porn-first-elements-of-screenplay-already-online-not-to-forget-the-shooting-of-the-film-next-year/

Today In History, Feb. 29:
“Gone with the Wind”

1940 McDaniel wins Oscar

In 1940, “Gone with the Wind” won eight Academy Awards, including best picture of 1939; Hattie McDaniel won for best supporting actress, the first black performer so honored.

On February 29, 1940, Gone with the Wind is honored with eight Oscars by the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. An epic Southern romance set during the hard times of the Civil War, the movie swept the prestigious Best Picture, Director, Screenplay, Cinematography, Art Direction, Film Editing, and Actress categories. However, the most momentous award that night undoubtedly went to Hattie McDaniel for her portrayal of “Mammy,” a housemaid and former slave. McDaniel, who won the Best Supporting Actress Academy Award, was the first African American actress or actor ever to be honored with an Oscar.

Born in Wichita, Kansas, in 1895, McDaniel demonstrated her talents as a singer and actress while growing up in Denver, Colorado. She left school while a teenager to become a performer in several traveling minstrel groups and in 1924 became one of the first African American women to sing on U.S. radio. With the onset of the Great Depression, she was forced to take work as a ladies’ washroom attendant in a Milwaukee club. The club, which hired only white performers, eventually made an exception and let her sing, and she performed there for a year before setting her sights on Hollywood.

56d09751c3a32.imageIn Los Angeles, she won a small role on a local radio show called The Optimistic Do-Nuts and before long had become the program’s main attraction. In 1932, she made her film debut as a Southern house servant in The Golden West. In American movies at the time, African American actors and actresses were generally limited to house servant roles, and McDaniel apparently embraced this stereotype, playing the role of maid or cook in nearly 40 films in the 1930s. Responding to criticism by groups such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) that she was perpetuating stereotypes, McDaniel responded that she would rather play a maid on the screen than be one in real life. Furthermore, she often subverted the stereotype by turning her maids into sassy, independent-minded characters who sometimes made white audiences shift uncomfortably in their seats.Her most famous role was as Mammy in the 1939 film Gone with the Wind. Directed by Victor Fleming and based on the best-selling Margaret Mitchell novel of the same name, the movie remains the highest-grossing movie of all time when inflation is taken into account. Although she was honored with an Oscar, liberal African Americans sharply criticized McDaniel for accepting a role in which her character, a former slave, spoke nostalgically about the Old South.

McDaniel’s film career declined in the late 1940s, and in 1947 she returned to radio as the star of the nationally broadcast The Beulah Show. In the program, she again portrayed an effervescent Southern maid but in a markedly un-stereotypical manner that won praise from the NAACP. In 1951, while filming the first episodes of a television version of the popular show, she had a heart attack. She recovered to do a few more radio programs but in 1952 died of breast cancer at the age of 57.

Rare script of Gone With The Wind found with ALTERNATE ending

A RARE script of Hollywood classic Gone With The Wind has emerged with an ALTERNATIVE ending 75 years after the film was first released.

The 1939 epic stars British icon Vivien Leigh as heroine Scarlett O’Hara and Clark Gable as her lover Rhett Butler in the iconic tear-jerker.

It is widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time and at the time won a record eight Academy Awards.

The original ending features a heart-broken Scarlett resolving to move on with her life after being left by Rhett.

But a newly discovered script has an alternative ending which could have portrayed Scarlett differently to the strong woman she is widely seen as.

Instead of speaking the famous line “After all, tomorrow is another day” she appeared much more distraught and desperately called after her ex-lover.

In the rare script she shouted: “Rhett!… Rhett!… You’ll come back. You’ll come back… I know you will!”

Experts say the alternative ending could have completely changed the feel of the film and made audiences view Scarlett in a different light.

The 251-page script is thought to have belonged to a production member and was acquired by a film fan who ran a book shop in Hollywood.

It is being sold at auction and is expected to fetch up to $5,000 (£3,000) when it goes under the hammer at Heritage Auctions in Dallas, Texas.

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The 251-page script has a different Gone With The Wind ending to the one seen
by movie fans.

Margaret Barrett, head of entertainment at Heritage, said: “What’s really interesting about this script is that it has an alternative ending to the one in the film.

“During the making of the film the makers played around with several different endings but eventually settled on the one we all know where Scarlett O’Hara speaks the famous line ‘After all, tomorrow is another day’.

“The various endings are known of among the most dedicated film fans but this script just serves as proof of the changes the director made during production.

“In the original ending Scarlett comes across as a strong, determined woman who will survive with or without Rhett, but this alternative ending is much more traditional – her life has been ruined because her man left her.

“Scarlett is such an enduring character because she is so independent. She was way ahead of her time in times of how women were viewed.

“This alternate ending shows her life is going to be about getting Rhett Butler back whereas in the original she is sad to see him go but it’s not the be all and end all.”

Gone With The Wind took $390million at the box office making it the highest grossing film of its time.

When adjusted for inflation the historical romance is the most successful film in box-office history.

Ms Barrett added: “I think the directors made the right decision sticking with the original ending because it best shows Scarlett’s true character – she was a fighter and that’s why we all love her so much.

“All the cast and crew would have had their own copy of the script so there are many hundreds associated with Gone with the Wind but I’ve never seen one with this ending before.

“It is not annotated so it is most likely a file copy kept by the studio for their archives.

“It comes to us from a private collector who used to own a book shop on Hollywood Boulevard. He has rubbed shoulders with lots of key Hollywood figures over the years and somehow ended up with this script.”

Gone with the Wind was first a  novel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gone_with_the_Wind

Gone_with_the_Wind_cover

 

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